MEETING REPORT

MONDAY 28 AUGUST

SESSION 1

Check out the Twitter Moments compilation of the opening and session 1 (past sea-level changes).

SESSION 2
  • For Twitter highlights of session 2 on recent and future sea-level changes, check out this moment.
  • Marta Marcos (Keynote)
    a.Tide gauge observations are very valuable but the number of observations decreases back in time and the measurements need to be corrected for vertical land movement
    b.Reconstructing global mean sea-level change in the 20th century remains challenging and has implications for estimating the acceleration of SLR
  • Roelof Rietbroek (Keynote)
    a.The satellite era, and specifically the GRACE era, is the ‘golden age’ of geodetic observations of sea-level change
    b.By combining different observational techniques, sea-level changes can be separated into mass and volume contributions
  • Breylla Campos Carvalho
    a.Sea-level rise affects coastal erosion at the coast of Rio de Janeiro, resulting in progression or retreat of shorelines depending on the specific location
    b.Coastal erosion and wave climate are enhanced more by La Nina than El Nino, opposite to situation in Northern Hemisphere
  • David Parkes
    a.The number of missing and disappeared glaciers can be estimated using a power law relation between the number of glaciers and their volume and hindcasting with a glacier model.
    b.Uncharted glaciers do not contribute significantly to a global mean sea-level equivalent at present, but might have contributed significantly to 20th century global mean sea level rise.
  • Molly Keogh
    a.In low coastal elevation zones, tide gauges underestimate relative sea level change because they are anchored at a depth below shallow subsidence
    b.Using a combination of a rod surface elevation table and a marker horizon can be used as an alternative to tide gauges to solve this problem
  • Jyoti Jadhav
    a.Multi-decadal sea-level variation in the Indian Ocean is mainly due to temperature changes.
    b.Internal variability might be the dominant contribution, and sea-level variability is correlated strongly with the Indian summer monsoons.
    c.Although monsoons last around 4 months, the effect of the monsoons on sea level lasts for a year.
  • Andra Garner
    a.In storm surge models downscaled from global circulation models, the intensity of cyclones near New York city by 2300 increases while storm surge height does not, because the path of the cyclones due to climate change is more seaward (away from New York City).
    b.When including sea-level rise in their simulations, different results are obtained, and significant increases in storm surge height are projected.
  • PUBLIC EVENT

    For an overview of the evening, read this news item by Stephan van Meulebrouck on the website of Utrecht University in Dutch and in English.

    TUESDAY 29 AUGUST – FIELD DAY

    For Twitter highlights of the field day, check out this moment.

    WEDNESDAY 30 AUGUST

    SESSION 3
    SESSION 4